Category Archives: News & Information

Time Out in a Tree House

Get a tree-house ready trees are now available at Fannin Tree Farm in Frisco

As a kid, tree houses were so cool to me. A house in the trees with the birds, squirrels, butterflies and lightning bugs. A getaway from a stinky brother, a private place for a princess. Growing up in the country surrounded by big North Texas trees, I used to dream of a treetop tree house I could live in forever reign; who knew that not only would it become a possibility one day but a trendy way to live! In addition to kid tree houses, now there are adult tree houses–resorts that boasted about on TV where people build most over-the-top ones. I never dreamed that tree houses would become chic for kids and adults alike. In fact, some days I wish someone would send me to timeout in a tree house.

As I look out at all the trees on our Frisco Tree Farm sales lot, I can’t help but think about the majestic Live Oaks, Chinese Pistaches and Bur Oaks that someday may make a tree house come true for a little princess, a fierce pirate, or that grownup trying to escape the daily drudges of adulthood. It brings a smile to my face that one day someone might take up residence in one of our trees. Not only will the tree bring joy to them but they will provide years of special memories for a “no girls allowed” fort, a reading nook, a pirate hangout, a chic adults-only getaway or one of the many other things a tree house can be.

Take a look at some of the cool tree houses we have found. When you find a tree house you are ready for, let Fannin Tree Farm know. We can provide a tree house ready tree, or we can give a tree house tree for the kids or grandkids in years to come.

Winter Tree Wrapping

Get a 3”x50’ roll of tree wrap at Fannin Tree Farm

There are some tree novices that think sunscald and sunburn mean the same, but they don’t.

Sunscald is caused by freezing temperatures preceding or following warm winter day temperature with high levels of sun exposure. The injury tends to happen on the southwest side of a tree with thin bark.

During the spring, as the tree begins to grow in trunk diameter the bark sloughs off and the injury becomes apparent. Wrapping sensitive thin bark trees, regardless of size, is advisable between November and March.

While many trees develop this condition, the Mature Red Oak is no longer considered to be sensitive to sunscald.

If you have any questions about sunscald, the importance of this preventative measure and other tree care related topics, contact Fannin Tree Farms to speak with one of our tree specialists.

Katy Trail Ice House Tree Installation

 Fannin Tree Farms’ Live Oak Trees get a new home at the Katy Trail Ice House I recently read something about how we like certain seasons of the year based on the positive things we correlate to them. Whether it was going to football games, campfires or just spending time with friends, some of my best memories have taken place in the fall. I remember as the temperatures dropped, my friends and family could find a great patio and hang out.

That’s why the tree installation we did at Katy Trail Ice House over the last few weeks meant so much to me. They made renovations to their patio which also included Fannin installing 21 large Live Oak Trees. Brian Jeffries, our Commercial Sales Manager, and Large Tree Expert led the project, and it was the second time we’ve had an opportunity to work with the popular Dallas restaurant and beer garden.

When installing large trees, proper tree planting and installation is imperative to the growth and survival of your new trees. Our trained professionals’ follow the essential steps necessary to help your tree get the best start possible, ensuring that your new trees live a long and healthy life. We also work the new tree owners to help them understand all the steps that are needed to be followed during the first few months after the tree is planted to ensure proper health and growth of the tree.

Fannin Tree Farm has over 40 years of growing, transporting and installing large mature trees. We own all of our equipment, and our large tree installation crew chiefs have been working for us for more than 30 years.

Here are a few photos from the installation. If you are ever looking for a great patio to hang out on check out Katy Trail Ice House and enjoy some majestic Fannin Live Oak Trees, we grew from seedlings.

 

How to Help Your Trees Thrive in the Fall

 

Caring for dead trees in the winter

Fall Thrive Program

By Bradley Boobar

Have you heard about our Fannin Thrive Tree Care Program?

In the Fall, trees slow down to prepare for the dormant season. Plant resources are being reallocated to other areas in the plant to optimize storage and restoration. This is a very good time of year to have your trees assessed by a professional arborist. Plants have the most optimal growth between the temperatures of 70 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit. During the fall, the moisture puts out the highest percentage of root growth. Typically, when the air temperatures are cooler than the soil, root growth is amplified more than new top growth. Increasing the root growth in the Fall also prepares the tree for future Spring growth.

We have a comprehensive program that we call the Fannin Thrive Program. Our Fall services include an assessment by a trained arborist and prescription fertilization services. In addition to fertilization, the arborist will assess each of your trees, provide pest and disease applications that can arise in the Fall and make recommendations for pruning, plant health maintenance, and other services.

If you are looking to improve your tree’s performance, or need help diagnosing a plant problem, the arborist at Fannin Tree Farm are the professionals you can trust. Our team is led by our Board-Certified Master Arborist and each one participates in continuing education programs to stay sharp in our profession.

Our fertilization and treatment services have proven to be effective in peer-reviewed research; all tree services provided by Fannin Tree Farm are in accordance to the ANSI A300 standards for arboriculture operations.

The Top Five Texas Trees for Planting

top texas tree live oak

Texans love their trees and share a strong relationship with its trees. Whether they’re being used for climbing, forgetting some desperately needed August shade, marveled at as tier role as a local landmark, as easy-to-remember landmarks for locals making plans to meet each other or a gathering place. We are lucky that our climate permits the planting of trees all year long. There are many kinds of trees available for planting in your yard. This is Fannin Tree Farm’s Top 5 list of Best Texas Trees to Plant.

live oak tree

Top Texas Tree #1: Live Oak

Live Oaks are large stature trees that are commonly around 50 ft tall with a short, stout trunk that casts a massive amount of canopy to create shade against the Texas heat. Their wood is very hardy making the tree easy to protect in stress. Live Oaks are some of the most popular and well-known landscape trees in Texas.
 
   

Top Texas Tree #2: Bur Oak

bur oak
Bur Oaks are large stature trees, native to Texas, also its large leaf and enormous acorn puzzles artistic interests in people. It great adaptability makes it an excellent choice for the Texas environment, as it can adapt to cold and extreme heat. Finally, Bur Oaks have a long taproot which makes it very drought tolerant and thrives well with small amount of water.
 
   

Top Texas Tree #3: Cedar Elm

cedar elm
Cedar Elms are known as the most common elm trees in Texas next to American Elms and are widespread throughout East, South, and Central Texas. Cedar Elms can typically grow in many kinds of soils which makes it a more desirable tree in most areas. As well, Cedar Elms are very drought tolerant and cast a very nice shade to fight the Texas heat.
 
   

Top Texas Tree #4: Bald Cypress

bald cypress
Bald Cypresses are native to Texas and adapt to various soil conditions, most commonly found in a more wet environment naturally. However, they can withstand those poorly drained areas more than most trees. They can be used for shade and have a very defined pyramidal shape with feather-like leaves that make them more aesthetically pleasing.
 
   

Top Texas Tree #5: Magnolia

southern magnolia
Magnolias are commonly known as “southern” trees and strive well in the more Eastern part of Texas. They have large, waxy, fragrant white flowers and large glossy, dark green, leathery leaves that appeal to the eye. Magnolias typically prefer full sun which Texas has no problem with providing and require deep well-drained soils to perform the best.

Fannin Fun Tree Facts

Tree Facts Are Fun!

I love fun facts about anything. You never know when they will come in handy at a party to break the ice, on a first date trying to impress, playing trivia on a cruise ship or just in everyday conversation. One of my favorite things about working at Fannin Tree Farm, other than the trees, is Mikey. Every day he has a new fact about trees to share, and believe you me, they have come in handy from time to time. I’m pretty sure my children and husband are over my fun tree fact finds but I wanted to share with our Fannin Fans some of my favorite tree facts.

  • There are 7.5 times more trees on earth than stars in the milky way.
  • An average size tree can provide enough wood to make 170,100 pencils!
  • The Amazon rainforest produces half the world’s oxygen supply.
  • Cricket bats are made out of a tree called Willow, and baseball bats are made out of wood from Hickory, Ash, Maple, and Bamboo trees.
  • Oak trees start producing acorns at 20-30 years of maturity!
  • Every Year in Washington DC The National Christmas Tree is put up and the walkway surrounding the National Christmas Tree features 56 state and territory trees decorated with handmade ornaments that are unique to each tree.

tree factsPathway of Peace, 2012 NPS/A.Garrison

  • Trees drink about 2,000 liters of water each year.
  • Pine trees are the only species in the whole world that spread seeds in cones, and those cones also have genders.
  • A tree can absorb as much as 48 pounds of carbon dioxide each year and can sequester 1 ton of carbon dioxide by the time it reaches 40 years old.
  • Trees lower air temperature by evaporating water in their leaves.
  • The different parts of a tree grow at various times throughout the year. Typically, most of the foliage growth happens in the spring, followed by trunk growth in the summer and root growth in the fall and winter.
  • Adding one tree to an open pasture can increase its bird biodiversity from almost zero species to as high as 80.
  • The world’s tallest living uncut decorated Christmas tree is a Douglas Fir. It is approximately 160 foot tall, lighted with over 50,000 LED lights and is located in Blue River, Oregon USA.

fun tree facts

  • Strategically planting trees and shrubs can save you up to 25 percent on your energy bills. Not only do they provide shade in the summer, but serve as a windbreak in the winter, too.
  • The Texas State Tree is the Pecan Tree
  • Our National Tree is the Oak Tree in the United States
  • There are approximately 25-30 million Real Christmas Trees sold in the U.S. every year.
  • Possibly the most colorful bark found on any tree in the world can be found in Hawaii, and it is referred to as the Rainbow Eucalyptus. Originating in the Philippines, the Mindanao gum tree in its natural habitat can grow up to 6 ft wide and over 250 ft tall. Outside of it, the tree only grows up to 125 ft.

tree trivia

Largest Tree in the US

General Sherman is a giant sequoia tree located in the Giant Forest of Sequoia National Park in the state of California. It stands 275 feet tall and is over 36 feet in diameter at the base. Sequoia trunks remain broad high up. Sixty feet above the base, the Sherman Tree is 17.5 feet in diameter.

facts about treesGeneral Sherman Tree at the north end of Giant Forest.

Trees Can Talk

A wise old man once made a statement that trees could talk. How could that be? Well, the answer is “of course.” All you must do is listen.

Listen: To the swaying branch of a tree, listen carefully.
Listen: To the leaves clapping their hands with laughter and delight.
Listen: As the trees groan to the weight of their limbs stretching in the early morning sun.
Listen: To the acorns falling to the earth, bouncing limb by limb as they fall gleefully until they rest peacefully on the ground.
Listen: As the limbs rub together like a fine violin and its bow.
Listen: As the sweet dew drops of water splash in freefall of symphony between leaves and branches making a joyous melody.
Listen: When birds land safely inside the limbs and branches and shout out to their friends “it’s safe to build our homes here and raise our families.”
Listen: As animals like trapeze artist swing branch to branch laughing as they play animal games.
Listen: As the moon speaks thru the trees all is well, and you can rest in the shade and darkness.
Listen: As the wind is told to slow down there are children at play in my branches.
Listen: As the sun provides a warm light to grow the young and old trees, and the crackle of new buds and leaves sound a graceful noise.

Complete Tree Care Services

Caring for trees is more than one size fits all approach. At Fannin Tree Farm, we are professional soil and plant scientist as well as Certified Arborist. In Fall of 2018, we are rolling out our Thrive Program – Advance.

The new Advance program is a holistic approach that is unique to your tree and shrub needs. This will allow us to develop a program that is tailored toward your specific needs and aesthetic goals. This program exceeds the standards of arboriculture (ANSI A300) and the Best Management Practices (BMPs).

We are utilizing an Integrated Pest Management approach to plant healthcare as well as our tailored fertilization program. Our program will require a full assessment by our professionals. This includes soil sampling and a condition assessment of the trees and shrubs. A prescription for proactive care will be provided after the assessment. Our team maintains photographic and field assessment records.

tree care service

Quarterly assessments are provided by our arborist. We maintain records for all treatments and closely review prior to an arborist visiting your property. Your program will include necessary treatments to prevent infections for common pest and diseases.

During the quarterly assessment, a health care report card is provided to the client. Our tree service coordinator will contact you to setup these quarterly assessments.

Thrive Program – Advance

  • Prescription Fertilization
  • Plant Pest and Disease Preventative Care Management
  • Quarterly Assessments and Recommendations
  • Winter Dormant Oil

Fannin Tree Farm is the largest tree contractor in the Dallas Fort Worth. We have been a staple in the community for over 40-years. Our tree care service team is ready to advance appropriate arboricultural care for the Dallas-Fort Worth and surrounding cities.

Learn more about the Thrive Tree Program or to request a quote. Call us today at 972-747-9233 and ask to setup a consultation with our Certified Tree Care Team!

What is Cotton Root Rot and How Does It Impact North Texas Trees?

Less than a century ago, the Dallas-Fort Worth area, was primarily agricultural land. This land was used to grow crops, hay, and raising cattle. The native tree species were much more limited. Now the land is used much differently. The old family farms are being developed into new shopping centers, homes, and other urban developments. The land use has changed and so has the landscape.

The DFW has added many new plant species to the pallet. As a landscape industry, we have integrated many plant species that have adapted to our area and climate. Some species were more successful than others. After many years of trial and error, plant diseases have found many suitable host species.

tree fungus mat
Photo 1: Fungal Mat ‘Phymatotrichopsis omnivora’

tree with cotton root rot
Photo 2: First Signs of Wilting

As new plant species were brought into our area, plant pathogens, whether native or not, have found their way in to our landscape as well. One disease that has over 2,300 host species (1,800 dicots), is known as, ‘Phymatotrichopsis omnivora’ (also referred to as, Cotton Root Rot, Texas Root Rot and Ozonia Root Rot). This is a soilborne fungus that lay dormant in the soil for many years.

As you may guess, cotton, a common crop that is grown in North Texas is very susceptible to this disease. Trees that are infected with Cotton Root Rot should be removed and only planted with tolerant or resistant plant species. Here’s a link to an online publication from Texas A&M University of Tolerant Plant Species: https://aggiehorticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/publications/cottonrootrot/cotton.html

Diagnosis is very easy during the early and mid-summer. As the soil temperature exceeds 82 degrees, Fahrenheit, which is usually in the spring and early summer, the disease will develop in the plant. The first symptoms are wilting, followed by death. Often smaller plants are quickly killed by this disease. While larger trees may require more time for the disease to terminate the tree.

As a diagnostician, we are looking for key symptoms and signs out in the field. Common species, like Lace Bark Elms are very commonly killed by this disease. During the early summer, we look for fungal mats that develop on top of the soil as a key indicator that the pathogen is present. It has been demonstrated in research that the fungal mat does not spread the spores, so don’t worry about spreading this pathogen if you walk through a fungal mat or two.

The Boots on the Ground Approach by Tree Care Professionals

tree care professionals

Landscaping is a multi-billion-dollar industry within horticulture. Trees are one of the most valuable amenities in a landscape. These assets need to be adequately cared for to maintain safe and functional green spaces. Whether you have trees at your home, place of business, or if you’re responsible for a master-planned development, trees are a significant consideration on real estate value.

If you have considered purchasing real estate, especially in a neighborhood, the landscape is one of the first things that you see. If your first impression is unmaintained landscape with dead, or dying trees, it can be a real turnoff.

It’s our responsibility as homeowners, managers, and developers to contract professionals to take care of landscapes and trees. An industry as large as horticulture, there are many contractors for hire. When considering any engagement, there should be a standard of education, training, and performance.

The International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) has built a certification program, for individuals to complete, to be certified as a tree care professional. A credentialed arborist should be an ISA Certified Arborist or an ISA Board Certified Master Arborist. Additional certifications and licensing is added-value and speaks mainly on their behalf. It is essential to contact a Certified Arborist to manage your trees.

Here is a link on “Why Hire a Certified Arborist”:
https://www.treesaregood.org/portals/0/docs/treecare/hire_arborist.pdf

After 20 years of managing trees and landscapes, I have found that time and continuity is the best value that I have provided my clients. I call this, “The Boots on the Ground Approach.” It requires many essential aspects:

  • An in-person meeting to discuss goals and objectives.
  • A thorough inspection of trees and landscape surroundings, to include potential hazards associated with recommended services.
  • Photo documentation and note-taking.
  • Follow up
    • Clearly written objectives in the form of a report or an estimate.
    • An email or phone call.
  • Services
    • Proper planning
    • Job briefings
    • Well executed performance
    • A service overview referred to as a debrief.

The Boots on the Ground Approach is like the old saying, “the best fertilizer is the farmer’s footsteps.”

Throughout my career, I have noticed one thing; clients are incredibly loyal. A good arborist listens to your needs and makes reasonable recommendations.

What should you be looking for in hiring a Certified Arborist?

  • They must be certified through the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA).
  • I would ask about their experience. A good arborist has gone through the appropriate training and may still be in training, under the supervision of an experienced arborist.
  • It’s beneficial for them to have advanced education in horticulture, agronomy, or forestry.
  • A good arborist has a good knowledge of other plants and how to care for them.
  • They should follow industry standard of arboriculture (ANSI A300 and ANSI Z133.1)
  • The company should maintain commercial liability insurance.
  • Ask for client references.

At Fannin Tree Farm we have a great team of knowledgeable professionals that are ready to help you maintain safe and sustainable trees. If you are interested in meeting with one of our arborists, contact us at 972-747-9233.