Author Archives: Fannin Tree Farm

Valley Ranch Tree Transplant

When Valley Ranch was bought by Centurion American Development Group they asked Fannin Tree Farm to help transplant and preserve the large live oaks on the property. Fannin spent about a month on the property transplanting and pruning the trees for the new housing development that will be going in Legends Crossing. As we celebrate Earth Day in April, we are pleased to be able to work with companies and individuals that want to preserve trees. The same trees that kept Dallas Cowboys players cool during workouts at the Valley Ranch practice facility will now provide shade for the next generation of up-and-coming football players playing in their yards.

The Top Five Texas Trees for Planting

top texas tree live oak

Texans love their trees and share a strong relationship with its trees. Whether they’re being used for climbing, forgetting some desperately needed August shade, marveled at as tier role as a local landmark, as easy-to-remember landmarks for locals making plans to meet each other or a gathering place. We are lucky that our climate permits the planting of trees all year long. There are many kinds of trees available for planting in your yard. This is Fannin Tree Farm’s Top 5 list of Best Texas Trees to Plant.

live oak tree

Top Texas Tree #1: Live Oak

Live Oaks are large stature trees that are commonly around 50 ft tall with a short, stout trunk that casts a massive amount of canopy to create shade against the Texas heat. Their wood is very hardy making the tree easy to protect in stress. Live Oaks are some of the most popular and well-known landscape trees in Texas.
 
   

Top Texas Tree #2: Bur Oak

bur oak
Bur Oaks are large stature trees, native to Texas, also its large leaf and enormous acorn puzzles artistic interests in people. It great adaptability makes it an excellent choice for the Texas environment, as it can adapt to cold and extreme heat. Finally, Bur Oaks have a long taproot which makes it very drought tolerant and thrives well with small amount of water.
 
   

Top Texas Tree #3: Cedar Elm

cedar elm
Cedar Elms are known as the most common elm trees in Texas next to American Elms and are widespread throughout East, South, and Central Texas. Cedar Elms can typically grow in many kinds of soils which makes it a more desirable tree in most areas. As well, Cedar Elms are very drought tolerant and cast a very nice shade to fight the Texas heat.
 
   

Top Texas Tree #4: Bald Cypress

bald cypress
Bald Cypresses are native to Texas and adapt to various soil conditions, most commonly found in a more wet environment naturally. However, they can withstand those poorly drained areas more than most trees. They can be used for shade and have a very defined pyramidal shape with feather-like leaves that make them more aesthetically pleasing.
 
   

Top Texas Tree #5: Magnolia

southern magnolia
Magnolias are commonly known as “southern” trees and strive well in the more Eastern part of Texas. They have large, waxy, fragrant white flowers and large glossy, dark green, leathery leaves that appeal to the eye. Magnolias typically prefer full sun which Texas has no problem with providing and require deep well-drained soils to perform the best.

Complete Tree Care Services

Caring for trees is more than one size fits all approach. At Fannin Tree Farm, we are professional soil and plant scientist as well as Certified Arborist. In Fall of 2018, we are rolling out our Thrive Program – Advance.

The new Advance program is a holistic approach that is unique to your tree and shrub needs. This will allow us to develop a program that is tailored toward your specific needs and aesthetic goals. This program exceeds the standards of arboriculture (ANSI A300) and the Best Management Practices (BMPs).

We are utilizing an Integrated Pest Management approach to plant healthcare as well as our tailored fertilization program. Our program will require a full assessment by our professionals. This includes soil sampling and a condition assessment of the trees and shrubs. A prescription for proactive care will be provided after the assessment. Our team maintains photographic and field assessment records.

tree care service

Quarterly assessments are provided by our arborist. We maintain records for all treatments and closely review prior to an arborist visiting your property. Your program will include necessary treatments to prevent infections for common pest and diseases.

During the quarterly assessment, a health care report card is provided to the client. Our tree service coordinator will contact you to setup these quarterly assessments.

Thrive Program – Advance

  • Prescription Fertilization
  • Plant Pest and Disease Preventative Care Management
  • Quarterly Assessments and Recommendations
  • Winter Dormant Oil

Fannin Tree Farm is the largest tree contractor in the Dallas Fort Worth. We have been a staple in the community for over 40-years. Our tree care service team is ready to advance appropriate arboricultural care for the Dallas-Fort Worth and surrounding cities.

Learn more about the Thrive Tree Program or to request a quote. Call us today at 972-747-9233 and ask to setup a consultation with our Certified Tree Care Team!

What is Cotton Root Rot and How Does It Impact North Texas Trees?

Less than a century ago, the Dallas-Fort Worth area, was primarily agricultural land. This land was used to grow crops, hay, and raising cattle. The native tree species were much more limited. Now the land is used much differently. The old family farms are being developed into new shopping centers, homes, and other urban developments. The land use has changed and so has the landscape.

The DFW has added many new plant species to the pallet. As a landscape industry, we have integrated many plant species that have adapted to our area and climate. Some species were more successful than others. After many years of trial and error, plant diseases have found many suitable host species.

tree fungus mat
Photo 1: Fungal Mat ‘Phymatotrichopsis omnivora’

tree with cotton root rot
Photo 2: First Signs of Wilting

As new plant species were brought into our area, plant pathogens, whether native or not, have found their way in to our landscape as well. One disease that has over 2,300 host species (1,800 dicots), is known as, ‘Phymatotrichopsis omnivora’ (also referred to as, Cotton Root Rot, Texas Root Rot and Ozonia Root Rot). This is a soilborne fungus that lay dormant in the soil for many years.

As you may guess, cotton, a common crop that is grown in North Texas is very susceptible to this disease. Trees that are infected with Cotton Root Rot should be removed and only planted with tolerant or resistant plant species. Here’s a link to an online publication from Texas A&M University of Tolerant Plant Species: https://aggiehorticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/publications/cottonrootrot/cotton.html

Diagnosis is very easy during the early and mid-summer. As the soil temperature exceeds 82 degrees, Fahrenheit, which is usually in the spring and early summer, the disease will develop in the plant. The first symptoms are wilting, followed by death. Often smaller plants are quickly killed by this disease. While larger trees may require more time for the disease to terminate the tree.

As a diagnostician, we are looking for key symptoms and signs out in the field. Common species, like Lace Bark Elms are very commonly killed by this disease. During the early summer, we look for fungal mats that develop on top of the soil as a key indicator that the pathogen is present. It has been demonstrated in research that the fungal mat does not spread the spores, so don’t worry about spreading this pathogen if you walk through a fungal mat or two.

The Boots on the Ground Approach by Tree Care Professionals

tree care professionals

Landscaping is a multi-billion-dollar industry within horticulture. Trees are one of the most valuable amenities in a landscape. These assets need to be adequately cared for to maintain safe and functional green spaces. Whether you have trees at your home, place of business, or if you’re responsible for a master-planned development, trees are a significant consideration on real estate value.

If you have considered purchasing real estate, especially in a neighborhood, the landscape is one of the first things that you see. If your first impression is unmaintained landscape with dead, or dying trees, it can be a real turnoff.

It’s our responsibility as homeowners, managers, and developers to contract professionals to take care of landscapes and trees. An industry as large as horticulture, there are many contractors for hire. When considering any engagement, there should be a standard of education, training, and performance.

The International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) has built a certification program, for individuals to complete, to be certified as a tree care professional. A credentialed arborist should be an ISA Certified Arborist or an ISA Board Certified Master Arborist. Additional certifications and licensing is added-value and speaks mainly on their behalf. It is essential to contact a Certified Arborist to manage your trees.

Here is a link on “Why Hire a Certified Arborist”:
https://www.treesaregood.org/portals/0/docs/treecare/hire_arborist.pdf

After 20 years of managing trees and landscapes, I have found that time and continuity is the best value that I have provided my clients. I call this, “The Boots on the Ground Approach.” It requires many essential aspects:

  • An in-person meeting to discuss goals and objectives.
  • A thorough inspection of trees and landscape surroundings, to include potential hazards associated with recommended services.
  • Photo documentation and note-taking.
  • Follow up
    • Clearly written objectives in the form of a report or an estimate.
    • An email or phone call.
  • Services
    • Proper planning
    • Job briefings
    • Well executed performance
    • A service overview referred to as a debrief.

The Boots on the Ground Approach is like the old saying, “the best fertilizer is the farmer’s footsteps.”

Throughout my career, I have noticed one thing; clients are incredibly loyal. A good arborist listens to your needs and makes reasonable recommendations.

What should you be looking for in hiring a Certified Arborist?

  • They must be certified through the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA).
  • I would ask about their experience. A good arborist has gone through the appropriate training and may still be in training, under the supervision of an experienced arborist.
  • It’s beneficial for them to have advanced education in horticulture, agronomy, or forestry.
  • A good arborist has a good knowledge of other plants and how to care for them.
  • They should follow industry standard of arboriculture (ANSI A300 and ANSI Z133.1)
  • The company should maintain commercial liability insurance.
  • Ask for client references.

At Fannin Tree Farm we have a great team of knowledgeable professionals that are ready to help you maintain safe and sustainable trees. If you are interested in meeting with one of our arborists, contact us at 972-747-9233.

What is the Water Smart Tax Holiday?

​Established in 2016, the Lawn & Garden Water Smart Tax Holiday was created to encourage responsible water use in Texas. During the Memorial Day Weekend event, certain water saving products are tax-free!

When is the Water Smart Tax Holiday?

The tax-free holiday falls on Memorial Day Weekend from Saturday, May 26 to Monday, May 28.

What water smart item qualify for the tax-free exemption?

Here are the categories of products that qualify for the sales tax exemption

  • Watersense Products: Any product tax free that displays a WaterSense label or logo whether for personal or business purposes.
  • Water-Conserving Products: Consumers can also purchase certain water-conserving products tax free. Unlike WaterSense-labeled items, these items are only exempt when purchased for use at a residential property.
  • Water Conservation Items: These would include items used or planted to conserve or retain groundwater, recharge water tables, or to decrease the ambient air temperature, limiting water evaporation

Here are some examples of items that qualify for the exemption:

  • Soaker or drip-irrigation hoses
  • Moisture control for a sprinkler or irrigation system
  • Mulch
  • Rain barrels or an alternative rain and moisture collection systems
  • Permeable ground cover surfaces that allows water to reach underground basins, aquifers or water collection points
  • All plants, trees and grasses
  • Water-saving surfactants
  • Soil and compost

What items do not qualify for the tax-free exemption?

Examples of items that do not qualify for the exemption include:

  • Construction/building materials
  • Awnings and other items used to create shade
  • Air conditioners
  • Ceiling fans
  • Sprinklers

Fannin Tree Farm is proud to be part of this annual event and help conserve one of our most precious and limited resources in Texas: water.

Fannin Tree Farm – Holiday Weekend Hours:

Saturday 5/26/18: 9am – 5pm
Sunday 5/27/18: 1pm to 5 pm
Monday (Memorial Day) 5/28/18: 10am – 3pm

Selecting Trees and Ongoing Management

Planting a tree is more than digging a hole and setting a tree. It requires proper selection and planning. A tree that is planted in the correct location, can be one of the most valuable assets in your garden. If properly cared for, the tree will provide many benefits that could be shared from one generation to the next. When selecting trees, it’s important to know what you are trying to achieve.

The first thing to do, it to assess your site.

  • What type of soil do you have?
  • Do you have enough space to plant a tree in the location you are considering?
  • Does this location have good drainage?
  • How far away from the foundation am I am going to plant this tree?
  • How much sunlight does this location receive?
  • Are there any overhead utility lines that may limit your tree selection?
  • Are there any site restrictions?
  • If planting in the back garden, how wide are my gates? Can I remove my fence to allow for a larger tree?

Once you have assessed your site, consider what you are trying to achieve.

  • Privacy
  • Aesthetics
  • Flowering
  • Fall color
  • Shade
  • Wind break

When planting a tree in a specific location, ask a tree specialist about the size of the tree at maturity. If planting multiple trees, consider spacing the trees 25 to 30 feet apart. If you are planting a large stature tree, try to plant about 25-feet away from your foundation or more.

Now that you have assessed your site and know what you are trying to achieve, its time to take some photos of the planting location. Bring these photos into a nursery and discuss your objectives with a tree specialist.
While meeting with a tree specialist, ask them to show you trees that are best suited for your site, that also achieve your goal. We advise our clients to ask us about the species and watering requirements. It is good to know if the tree you are considering is a dry climate, moist environment, or moderate water-loving species? You may also ask if this tree will grow in my soils? Some trees prefer well-drained soils, so planting a dry climate species in a location that stays wet, might not be the best idea. If you have a soil with a high pH, consider a tree that will grow in alkaline soil.

While at the nursery, assess the tree before you make a decision. Look at the base of the tree to inspect the root collar. This is sometimes referred to as the root flare. It should resemble the base of a wine glass that tapers outward.

If you are looking for an upright tree, evaluate the tree for good branch structure. A tree with a central leading branch is a good indicator it will grow upright. Then assess the trunk to make sure there are no major scars or damages that jeopardize the health of the tree.

If you are looking to plant a tree for aesthetics, consider the orientation of the tree. Make sure the tree will fit the space. While trees like Live Oaks and Chinese Pistache, are naturally oriented to grow wide. Then there are trees like Red Oaks, Cedar Elms and Hybrid Maples that grow upright and provide height in your garden. Remember to look for overhead utility lines. If you have power lines that are located above the planting location, consider planting a small or medium size tree.

Sometimes we plant trees for shading a home to reduce energy bills. If this is the case, consider planting the tree on the west side of the home. You may consider a deciduous tree (drops its leaves in the winter) to reduce the amount of energy used to heat your home.

Last but not least ask the tree specialist for a watering and care guide. Thoroughly review the guide and discuss any areas of concern with the specialist. If you are confused about ongoing care for your tree, consider hiring a certified arborist for tree maintenance.

At Fannin Tree Farm we have a large inventory of trees of trees that grow well in the Dallas-Fort Worth and surrounding areas. Come by and see our selection and meet with one of our tree specialists. We have a great team of knowledgeable experts that are ready to help you find trees that will last for generations, contact us at 972-747-9233.

Fire Blight on Ornamental Pears

February is here and we are fast approaching spring. Most of us are working hard to reach our new year goals. We may even be planning big things, such as Valentine’s day. This time of year, couldn’t be busier for families with school and extracurricular activities. In the midst of all of this busyness, Fannin Tree Farm wants to remind you to think about your trees.

In the month of February, some trees are preparing to bloom. Buds are swelling in preparation for spring. Ornamental Pears, which include Bradford, Cleveland, and Aristocrat Pears to name a few, are ready to flower. Around the third week of February, these pears will provide a floral display that is not easily match, especially for the time of year.

This display is short-lived, approximately 3-to-4 weeks long. While it is when the tree is most beautiful, it is also when the tree is most vulnerable. A bacterium referred to as Fire Blight (Erwinia amylovora) often infects the tree by entering the blooms. This floral infection is very destructive as it develops throughout the tree.

Luckily, there are management practices that have been demonstrated to be effective in suppressing these infections. Our best method for preventing Fire Blight is sanitation pruning.

At Fannin Tree Farm we use Lysol to clean our tools after removing infected plant parts. This reduces the inoculum and prevents further disease spread throughout different parts of the tree.

We also provide weekly spray treatments using antibiotics and bactericides. These treatments are very effective if applied weekly, during the flowering period.

After it’s all said and done, the flowers are gone, an untreated flowering pear, may now be infected. This pathogen over-winters, in canker sites on branches throughout the crown. It is spread by splashing water and facilitated by pollinating insects, such as honey bees. Time will tell if an untreated tree is infected.


In the late spring, early summer, an infected tree should show signs of this disease. Brown, blighted shoot tips will wilt rapidly. This blighted shoot is referred to as, “shepherd’s crook.” At the beginning of the disease development, leaves on the diseased shoots show a blackening along the midrib and veins.

Later, as the disease progresses in the plant, it develops in the water conducting tissue. The bacterium multiplies, reducing the translocation of water and nutrients, and causes cracks in the bark that appear to be sunken on the surface. An amber-colored bacterial ooze may be identified on the bark. A brown-to-black discoloration of the wood beneath the bark may help identify the disease.

You may ask, can an infected tree still be managed? The answer depends on the severity of the infection. A young, healthier, flowering pear may be able to live with this disease for a few years. While an older tree may see rapid decline.

We always recommend sanitation pruning to prevent the disease spread. Appropriate amounts of fertilizer will help the plant maintain vigorous growth and prevent susceptibility to branch cankers. Other treatments using antibiotics and bactericides have been demonstrated to suppress the expression of the disease. We recommend spray applications during the blooming period, but sometimes micro injection through the root flare, or lower trunk may be necessary.

The best way to manage this disease is through prevention. The best time to develop a plan is now. If you would like a free consultation with one of our Certified Arborist, please contact us today at 972-747-9233.

Tips for Preventing Live Christmas Tree Fires

We may not sell Christmas trees here at Fannin Tree Farm, but we are passionate about the health – and safety – of all trees. And when you bring a live tree into the home like so many do during the holiday season, it’s that much more important to exercise important safety precautions.

Christmas tree fires are thankfully rare in the U.S., with an average of only 200 annually nationwide, but with these basic tips, we can hopefully get that number down to zero.

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Christmas Trees? No, Trees for Christmas!

christmas-gift-card-300x250The Fannin fans out there – the “Fan”nins (okay, we’ll workshop that) – know that we don’t do Christmas trees at Fannin Tree Farm. But, that doesn’t mean we don’t do trees for Christmas.

In fact, a Fannin tree is the perfect holiday gift this year. Trees bring years of warmth, character and personality to any home, perfect for an established property looking to make a change, or a new homeowner looking to plant their very first tree. And no tree farm in DFW has a better selection and the top-quality installation services of Fannin Tree Farm in Frisco, TX. It’s our passion, and what better time to gift that passion to a loved one?

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